Issue 31

Welcome to our very autumnal newsletter in which we shall try to brighten your days by bringing you a bevvy of beautiful things for you to acquire. As many of you gear yourselves up for a noisy and hopefully fun-filled celebration to our notorious Guy Fawkes and contemplate the majesty of the historic 800-year old Lord Mayor’s show (for those in London, at least), we are sorting out our next exhibition. 

If you have a yearning to tramp across the Heath to blow out the cobwebs perhaps you should be searching for the wonderful wild flowers that you may find there at this time of year such as shepherd’s purse, yarrow and pyracantha. However, if you prefer a more warming, less vigorous pastime then may we suggest our upcoming exhibition of Chagall Prints.

Chagall Prints

November 7th and 8th is our launch weekend for this wonderful show of Chagall’s print work and we hope you will find the time to drop in and visit and share a glass of wine with us whilst you contemplate your choices. With over 70 pieces due for delivery this week, we know that you will be delighted by what we will have on offer. Please see the full colour catalogue online on our website for a quick preview and there will be one on its way to you in the post shortly. Click to view catalogue

During a 75-year career, Chagall made an astonishing 10,000 works of art, many of which were prints. He was a prolific lithographer and etcher and these more affordable artworks are as collectible as any of his paintings. Charles Sorlier, master lithographer at the Atelier Mourlot in Paris wrote of Marc Chagall, his lifelong friend and collaborator:

“Chagall chose lithography as a medium that could offer him almost unlimited painterly freedom to explore his world. Since lithography is a technique where the artist can work directly on the printing plate or lithostone, the resultant prints convey the spontaneity of Chagall’s brushstrokes and drawn lines.  Lithography also allowed Chagall to work in lush colour, which he viewed as his métier, and for which Chagall has become renowned. Chagall’s lithographs are now among the most collected art works of the 20th century.”

Picasso once said of Chagall’s work “I don’t know where he gets those images… he must have an angel in his head.”

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Marc Chagall, The Clown with Flowers, unsigned, £750
Marc Chagall, The Dance, unsigned, £775
Marc Chagall, The Dance, unsigned, £775
Marc Chagall, Monumental XX Siecle, 1973, unsigned, £850
Marc Chagall, Monumental XX Siecle, 1973, unsigned, £850
Marc Chagall, Angel of Paradise, The Bible Series, unsigned, £750
Marc Chagall, Angel of Paradise, The Bible Series, unsigned, £750
Marc Chagall, The Two Parrots, the King and his Son, La Fables de la Fontaine, signed in plate, £3,250
Marc Chagall, The Two Parrots, the King and his Son, La Fables de la Fontaine, signed in plate, £3,250

Phil Rogers

Alongside the the romance and whimsy that is Chagall, we will be showcasing the magnificent work of potter, Phil Rogers. Rogers’ work is often described as Anglo-Orientalism because of the way in which he integrates the English approach to pot-making with that of the East; a marriage of style, form and technique first pioneered by Bernard Leach. Rogers now operates from three kilns; one dedicated to salt glazes, one that is oil fired and a newer, two-chambered wood-fired kiln. As a result, there is an increasingly rich diversity to the finishes and effects that Rogers now achieves with his pot-making. In his own words Rogers describes his pot-making as follows:

“I am not a potter attempting to make social or political statement. Rather, I am trying with the best of my ability to provide an audience with work that has beauty, grace and function while, at the same time, furthering a tradition that I am happy and comfortable to be a part of. The challenge for me is to find my own way along a narrow path, to seek creatively that variation and nuance that distinguish my pots from the work of another.”

Certainly we love his pots and were particularly delighted when, in the summer, we came across both his work and his books in the potter’s village of La Borne in central France. Clearly his work is as highly regarded there as it is here.

Phil Rogers, Teardrop bottle; ash glaze with hakeme; incised pattern, 30 x 16.5cm, £550
Phil Rogers, Teardrop bottle; ash glaze with hakeme; incised pattern, 30 x 16.5cm, £550
Phil Rogers, Plate; nuka with finger wipes, 6 x 31cm, £320
Phil Rogers, Plate; nuka with finger wipes, 6 x 31cm, £320
Phil Rogers, Jar; ridges, pine ash glaze, 28.5 x 23cm, £485
Phil Rogers, Jar; ridges, pine ash glaze, 28.5 x 23cm, £485

Christmas opening hours

As the season to be jolly fast approaches you might like to note that we will be open as follows:

Late night shopping: starting from November 5, we will be open late EVERY Thursday until Christmas so panic not, we will be here until 9.00pm every Thursday evening (with a ready glass of wine should you feel the need for one).

In the final run-up to Christmas we will be open at our normal times on our usual days. However, we will be closed on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and December 27 but will reopen on Wednesday 30 December.  Apart from closing early on New Years Day – 4.00pm – we will be open as usual.

Dates for the diary

Going forwards we will have dedicated exhibitions in January, March, May, July, September and November and whilst we know when, we have not yet finalised the what so watch this space for more news, especially about the January show.

As ever, feel free to call, email and even drop-in for a chat and we will endeavour to help you find something suitable to hang on your wall or sit on your shelf and although our front door is no longer open because it is too cold, it is not locked so just push it open for a warm welcome.